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SSG Bibliography

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Papers using the resources provided by the SSG and predecessors. Papers related to the Synthetic Data Server, which also received funding from these grants, are noted separately. The full bibliography can be downloaded here (BibTeX).

2013
  • J. M. Abowd, M. Schneider, and L. Vilhuber, "Differential Privacy Applications to Bayesian and Linear Mixed Model Estimation," Journal of Privacy and Confidentiality, vol. 5, iss. 1, 2013.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{AbowdSchneiderVilhuber2013,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Matthew Schneider and Lars Vilhuber},
    title = {Differential Privacy Applications to Bayesian and Linear Mixed Model
    Estimation},
    journal = {Journal of Privacy and Confidentiality},
    year = {2013},
    volume = {5},
    number = {1},
    institution = {Labor Dynamics Institute, Cornell University},
    owner = {lv39},
    timestamp = {2013.10.28},
    url = {http://repository.cmu.edu/jpc/vol5/iss1/4}
    }
  • M. Freedman and T. McGavock, "Low-Income Housing Developement, Poverty Concentration and Neighbourhood Quality," Cornell University, Working Paper , 2013.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{freedman_2013,
    author = {Mathew Freedman and Tamara {McGavock}},
    title = {Low-Income Housing Developement, Poverty Concentration and Neighbourhood
    Quality},
    institution = {Cornell University},
    year = {2013},
    type = {Working Paper},
    month = {June},
    url = {$http://works.bepress.com/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1052&context=matthew\_freedman$}
    }
  • M. Freedman, E. Owens, and S. Bohn, "Immigration, Employment Opportunities, and Criminal Behavior," Cornell University 2013.
    [Abstract] [URL] [Bibtex]

    There is little consensus on the effects of immigration on crime. One potential explanation for the conflicting evidence is heterogeneity across space and time in policies toward immigrants that affect their status in the community. In this paper, we take advantage of provisions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA), which granted legal resident status to long-time illegal residents but created new obstacles to employment for more recent immigrants, to explore how employment opportunities affect criminal behavior. Exploiting unique administrative data on the criminal justice involvement of individuals in San Antonio, Texas and using a difference-in-differences methodology, we find evidence of an increase in felony charges filed against Hispanic residents of San Antonio after the expiration of the IRCA amnesty deadline. This was concentrated in neighborhoods where recent immigrants are most likely to locate, suggesting a strong relationship between access to legal jobs and criminal behavior.

    @TECHREPORT{freedmanowens_2013,
    author = {Matthew Freedman and Emily Owens and Sarah Bohn},
    title = {Immigration, Employment Opportunities, and Criminal Behavior},
    institution = {Cornell University},
    year = {2013},
    abstract = {There is little consensus on the effects of immigration on crime.
    One potential explanation for the conflicting evidence is heterogeneity
    across space and time in policies toward immigrants that affect their
    status in the community. In this paper, we take advantage of provisions
    of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA), which granted
    legal resident status to long-time illegal residents but created
    new obstacles to employment for more recent immigrants, to explore
    how employment opportunities affect criminal behavior. Exploiting
    unique administrative data on the criminal justice involvement of
    individuals in San Antonio, Texas and using a difference-in-differences
    methodology, we find evidence of an increase in felony charges filed
    against Hispanic residents of San Antonio after the expiration of
    the IRCA amnesty deadline. This was concentrated in neighborhoods
    where recent immigrants are most likely to locate, suggesting a strong
    relationship between access to legal jobs and criminal behavior.},
    url = {$http://works.bepress.com/matthew\_freedman/27$}
    }
  • W. D. Hansen and H. Naughton, "Social and Ecological Determinants of Land Clearing in the Brazilian Amazon: A Spatial Analysis," Land Economics, vol. 89, iss. 4, pp. 699-721, 2013.
    [Abstract] [URL] [Bibtex]

    While tropical land clearing provides for the livelihoods of Brazilians from many socioeconomic backgrounds, it also affects climatological and ecological processes. To develop sustainable forest use, further study is needed to investigate the causes of tropical land clearing. This study uses spatial econometric techniques to estimate the effects of ecosystem productivity, measured by soil fertility and climate, and strategic interactions on municipal-level land clearing in the Brazilian Legal Amazon between 1975 and 1995. We find a negative relationship between soil fertility and land clearing. Furthermore, there is evidence of positive spatial interactions across municipalities. (JEL C31, Q24)

    @ARTICLE{HansenNaughton2013,
    author = {Winslow D. Hansen and Helen Naughton},
    title = {Social and Ecological Determinants of Land Clearing in the {B}razilian
    {A}mazon: {A} Spatial Analysis},
    journal = {Land Economics},
    year = {2013},
    volume = {89},
    pages = {699-721},
    number = {4},
    month = {November},
    abstract = {While tropical land clearing provides for the livelihoods of Brazilians
    from many socioeconomic backgrounds, it also affects climatological
    and ecological processes. To develop sustainable forest use, further
    study is needed to investigate the causes of tropical land clearing.
    This study uses spatial econometric techniques to estimate the effects
    of ecosystem productivity, measured by soil fertility and climate,
    and strategic interactions on municipal-level land clearing in the
    Brazilian Legal Amazon between 1975 and 1995. We find a negative
    relationship between soil fertility and land clearing. Furthermore,
    there is evidence of positive spatial interactions across municipalities.
    (JEL C31, Q24)},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://le.uwpress.org/content/89/4/699.abstract}
    }
  • H. R. Hyatt and J. R. Spletzer, "The Recent Decline in Employment Dynamics," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, vol. 2, iss. 5, 2013.
    [DOI] [URL] [Bibtex]
  • H. R. Hyatt and J. R. Spletzer, "The Recent Decline in Employment Dynamics," Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), IZA Discussion Papers 7231, 2013.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7231,
    author = {Hyatt, Henry R. and Spletzer, James R.},
    title = {The Recent Decline in Employment Dynamics},
    institution = {Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)},
    year = {2013},
    type = {IZA Discussion Papers},
    number = {7231},
    month = February,
    owner = {vilhuber},
    timestamp = {2013.10.07},
    url = {http://ideas.repec.org/p/iza/izadps/dp7231.html}
    }
  • S. Lam, "Silicon Nation: Industrial Clusters and Labour Pooling in the US," MSc in Social Research Methods Master Thesis, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @MASTERSTHESIS{Lam2013,
    author = {Stanley Lam},
    title = {Silicon Nation: Industrial Clusters and Labour Pooling in the {US}},
    school = {London School of Economics},
    year = {2013},
    type = {MSc in Social Research Methods}
    }
  • E. W. Mezey, "THREE ESSAYS IN APPLIED LABOR AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS," Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy PhD Thesis, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @PHDTHESIS{Mezey2013,
    author = {Esther Washburn Mezey},
    title = {THREE ESSAYS IN APPLIED LABOR AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS},
    school = {Cornell University},
    year = {2013},
    type = {Dissertation
    Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School
    of Cornell University
    in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of
    Doctor of Philosophy}
    }
2012
  • J. Abowd, K. Gittings, K. L. McKinney, B. E. Stephens, L. Vilhuber, and S. Woodcock, "Dynamically Consistent Noise Infusion and Partially Synthetic Data as Confidentiality Protection Measures for Related Time-Series," 2012.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Abowd2012,
    author = {John Abowd and Kaj Gittings and Kevin L. McKinney and Bryce E. Stephens
    and Lars Vilhuber and Simon Woodcock},
    title = {Dynamically Consistent Noise Infusion and Partially Synthetic Data
    as Confidentiality Protection Measures for Related Time-Series},
    year = {2012},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1004&context=ldi}
    }
  • J. M. Abowd and I. M. Schmutte, "Endogenous Mobility," 2012.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{AbowdSchmutte2012_direct,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Ian M. Schmutte},
    title = {Endogenous Mobility},
    year = {2012},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://emlab.berkeley.edu/users/webfac/moretti/e251_s12/abowd.pdf}
    }
  • J. M. Abowd, M. Schneider, and L. Vilhuber, "Differential Privacy Applications to Bayesian and Linear Mixed Model Estimation," Labor Dynamics Institute, Cornell University 2012.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{AbowdLarsSchneider_direct,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Matthew Schneider and Lars Vilhuber},
    title = {Differential Privacy Applications to Bayesian and Linear Mixed Model
    Estimation},
    institution = {Labor Dynamics Institute, Cornell University},
    year = {2012},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1002&context=ldi}
    }
  • J. M. Abowd and L. Vilhuber, "Did the Housing Price Bubble Clobber Local Labor Market Job and Worker Flows When It Burst?," American Economic Review, vol. 102, iss. 3, pp. 589-93, 2012.
    [DOI] [URL] [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{vilhuber_2012,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Lars Vilhuber},
    title = {Did the Housing Price Bubble Clobber Local Labor Market Job and Worker
    Flows When It Burst?},
    journal = {American Economic Review},
    year = {2012},
    volume = {102},
    pages = {589-93},
    number = {3},
    doi = {10.1257/aer.102.3.589},
    url = {http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.102.3.589}
    }
  • J. M. Abowd, L. Vilhuber, and W. Block, "A Proposed Solution to the Archiving and Curation of Confidential Scientific Inputs," in Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2012, pp. 216-225.
    [DOI] [URL] [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{abowd_2012,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Lars Vilhuber and William Block},
    title = {A Proposed Solution to the Archiving and Curation of Confidential
    Scientific Inputs},
    booktitle = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
    year = {2012},
    editor = {Josep Domingo-Ferrer and Ilenia Tinnirello},
    volume = {7556},
    series = {Privacy in Statistical Databases},
    pages = {216-225},
    month = {September},
    publisher = {Springer},
    doi = {10.1007/978-3-642-33627-0},
    url = {$http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-33627-0\_17$}
    }
  • T. Drautzburg, Entrepreneurial Tail Risk: Implications for Employment Dynamics, 2012.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @UNPUBLISHED{drautzburg_2012,
    author = {Thorsten Drautzburg},
    title = {Entrepreneurial Tail Risk: Implications for Employment Dynamics},
    note = {Job Market Paper},
    month = {December},
    year = {2012},
    url = {https://3f5cb97c-a-62cb3a1a-s-sites.googlegroups.com/site/tdrautzburg/research/JMP_web.pdf?attachauth=ANoY7cp7CTRuIHP1S4ijG9EfKRg0f7jtlmvpt09ARPSxt1g4tqt76sw9ghi1vdVTtFeDzylLT5jKPU10va8UP2-KB48T-26nXcxx0DVahwbOkCzK6l5w6OMeLFGGuvHsLORnWVHqRVBvNNYKuQtPzZQ-S5GOpZR5zJAtpj8jz2E3nmCHMI-wV91twD-FVyKmZGneNVV5oqE8Tscj2eJZAb6aRQVZs-heXCR2O1InRk4JOKmcCb6u0n8%3D&attredirects\=0}
    }
  • A. Dube, W. T. Lester, and M. Reich, "Minimum Wage Shocks, Employment Flows and Labor Market Frictions," Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, mimeo , 2012.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{DubeLesterReich2012,
    author = {Arindrajit Dube and T. William Lester and Michael Reich},
    title = {Minimum Wage Shocks, Employment Flows and Labor Market Frictions},
    institution = {Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst},
    year = {2012},
    type = {mimeo},
    month = {April},
    owner = {vilhuber},
    timestamp = {2012.10.22},
    url = {http://www.irle.berkeley.edu/workingpapers/122-12.pdf}
    }
  • M. Freedman and E. Owens, "Your Friends and Neighbors: Localized Economic Development, Inequality and Criminal Activity," Cornell University 2012.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Freedman_Owens_direct,
    author = {Matthew Freedman and Emily Owens},
    title = {Your Friends and Neighbors: Localized Economic Development, Inequality
    and Criminal Activity},
    institution = {Cornell University},
    year = {2012},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://works.bepress.com/matthew_freedman/17/}
    }
  • M. Freedman, "Teaching New Markets Old Tricks: The Effects of Subsidized Inverstment on Low-Income Neighborhoods," Journal of Public Economics, vol. 96, iss. 11-12, pp. 1000-1014, 2012.
    [Abstract] [DOI] [URL] [Bibtex]

    This paper examines the effects of investment subsidized by the federal government's New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) program, which provides tax incentives to encourage private investment in low-income neighborhoods. I identify the impacts of the program by taking advantage of a discontinuity in the rule determining the eligibility of census tracts for NMTC-subsidized investment. Using this discontinuity as a source of quasi-experimental variation in commercial development across tracts, I find that subsidized investment has modest positive effects on neighborhood conditions in low-income communities. Though spillovers appear to be small and crowd out incomplete, the results suggest that some of the observed impacts on neighborhoods are attributable to changes in the composition of residents as opposed to improvements in the welfare of existing residents.

    @ARTICLE{Freedman2012_JPE,
    author = {Matthew Freedman},
    title = {Teaching New Markets Old Tricks: The Effects of Subsidized Inverstment
    on Low-Income Neighborhoods},
    journal = {Journal of Public Economics},
    year = {2012},
    volume = {96},
    pages = {1000-1014},
    number = {11-12},
    month = {December},
    abstract = {This paper examines the effects of investment subsidized by the federal
    government's New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) program, which provides
    tax incentives to encourage private investment in low-income neighborhoods.
    I identify the impacts of the program by taking advantage of a discontinuity
    in the rule determining the eligibility of census tracts for NMTC-subsidized
    investment. Using this discontinuity as a source of quasi-experimental
    variation in commercial development across tracts, I find that subsidized
    investment has modest positive effects on neighborhood conditions
    in low-income communities. Though spillovers appear to be small and
    crowd out incomplete, the results suggest that some of the observed
    impacts on neighborhoods are attributable to changes in the composition
    of residents as opposed to improvements in the welfare of existing
    residents.},
    doi = {10.1016/j.jpubeco.2012.07.006},
    institution = {Cornell University},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.02},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047272712000886}
    }
  • M. Freedman, "Teaching New Markets Old Tricks: The Effects of Subsidized Inverstment on Low-Income Neighborhoods," Cornell University 2012.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Freedman2012_direct,
    author = {Matthew Freedman},
    title = {Teaching New Markets Old Tricks: The Effects of Subsidized Inverstment
    on Low-Income Neighborhoods},
    institution = {Cornell University},
    year = {2012},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.02},
    url = {http://works.bepress.com/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1012&context=matthew_freedman}
    }
  • M. Freedman, "Place-Based Programs and the Geographic Dispersion of Employment," Cornell University 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{freedman_direct,
    author = {Matthew Freedman},
    title = {Place-Based Programs and the Geographic Dispersion of Employment},
    institution = {Cornell University},
    year = {2012},
    comment = {Working Paper},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01}
    }
  • M. Freedman, "Targetted Business Invcentives and Local Labor Markets," Cornell University 2012.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Freedman_direct,
    author = {Matthew Freedman},
    title = {Targetted Business Invcentives and Local Labor Markets},
    institution = {Cornell University},
    year = {2012},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.02},
    url = {http://works.bepress.com/matthew_freedman/16/}
    }
  • M. Greenstone and A. Mas, "Do Credit Market Shocks affect the real economy? Quasi-Experimental Evidence from the Great Recession and `Normal' Economic Times," MIT Department of Economics, Working Paper No. 12-27 2012.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{greenstone_2012,
    author = {Michael Greenstone and Alexander Mas},
    title = {Do Credit Market Shocks affect the real economy? Quasi-Experimental
    Evidence from the Great Recession and `Normal' Economic Times},
    institution = {MIT Department of Economics, Working Paper No. 12-27},
    year = {2012},
    month = {November},
    url = {http://ssrn.com/abstract=2187521}
    }
  • E. Owens, "Lessons from the Economics of Crime: What Works in Reducing Offending," , O. M. Philip Cook Stephen Machin and G. Mastrobouni, Eds., Cambridge: MIT Press, 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @INBOOK{Owens2012_direct,
    chapter = {COPS and Cuffs},
    title = {Lessons from the Economics of Crime: What Works in Reducing Offending},
    publisher = {Cambridge: MIT Press},
    year = {2012},
    editor = {Philip Cook, Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie and Giovanni Mastrobouni},
    author = {Emily Owens},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.08}
    }
  • E. Owens, "The Birth of Organized Crime? The American Temperance Movement and Market-Based Violence," Cornell University 2012.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Owens_direct,
    author = {Emily Owens},
    title = {The Birth of Organized Crime? The {A}merican Temperance Movement
    and Market-Based Violence},
    institution = {Cornell University},
    year = {2012},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.02},
    url = {http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1865347}
    }
  • E. Owens and F. Cornaglia, "Estimating the Impact of Crime on Fear and the Daily Activities of Non-Victims," Cornell University 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Cornaglia_direct,
    author = {Emily Owens and Francesca Cornaglia},
    title = {Estimating the Impact of Crime on Fear and the Daily Activities of
    Non-Victims},
    institution = {Cornell University},
    year = {2012},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.02}
    }
  • E. Owens and G. DeAngelo, "Learning the Ropes: Task-Specific Experience and the Output of Idaho State Troopers," Cornell University 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{DeAngelo_direct,
    author = {Emily Owens and Gregory {DeAngelo}},
    title = {Learning the Ropes: Task-Specific Experience and the Output of {Idaho}
    State Troopers},
    institution = {Cornell University},
    year = {2012},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.02}
    }
  • R. Stanley, "Food Aid and Child Health," PhD Thesis, 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @PHDTHESIS{Stanley2012_direct,
    author = {Richard Stanley},
    title = {Food Aid and Child Health},
    school = {Department of Politics and International Relations, University of
    Oxford, UK},
    year = {2012},
    month = {June},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.20}
    }
  • M. R. Strain, "Essays on labor economics and public policy," Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy PhD Thesis, 2012.
    [Abstract] [Bibtex]

    The main component of this thesis, found in the first chapter, is an investigation of earnings instability, which can be thought of as the fluctuations around permanent earnings over time of a worker's labor market earnings. This chapter reflects my interests in labor economics and in economic analysis using longitudinal, linked worker-firm data. The instability of labor earnings in the United States contributes to earnings inequality and may diminish household welfare. Despite the importance of earnings instability little is known about its correlates or causes. This study seeks to better understand whom earnings instability affects and why it affects them. Using both parametric and semi-parametric techniques, I provide an in-depth investigation into the relationship between earnings instability and worker skill. I find that earnings instability follows a U-shape over skill, with low-skill workers experiencing the least stable earnings, middle-skill workers experiencing the most stable, and high-skill workers falling in between the two. This finding is robust to a number of controls, sample selections, and other statistical concerns, and is not driven by workers entering and leaving employment, changing jobs, or holding multiple jobs. I then investigate whether firm characteristics affect the stability of worker earnings. I am the first to directly test the relationship between earnings instability and firm employment instability using linked employer-employee data. I find a positive and statistically significant relationship between the two that remains when the effect is estimated using only within-firm variation. This suggests that the effect is a feature of the way workers are being paid by their employer. The size of the effect varies by a worker's position in the earnings distribution: low-earning worker are passed a greater share of firm employment instability than higher-earning workers. This finding helps to explain the left tail of the U-shape of earnings instability over skill. I find significant heterogeneity in the magnitude and significance of the effect across industries and explore how the competitiveness of an industry relates to the size of the industry-specific effect. My interest in the economics of education is reflected in the second essay of this thesis, which studies a public policy innovation using administrative records. The effects of single-sex education are hotly contested, both in academic and policy circles. Despite this heated debate, there exists little credible empirical evidence of the effect of a U.S. public school's decision to offer single-sex classrooms on the educational outcomes of students. This study seeks to fill this hole. Using administrative records for third through eighth graders in North Carolina public schools, the chapter finds evidence that the offering of single-sex mathematics courses is associated with lower performance on end-of-grade math exams, and finds no evidence that the offering of single-sex reading scores increases performance on reading exams. Evidence of significant heterogeneity in the effect across schools is also presented. Finally, my interest in public policy is further reflected in the third chapter of this thesis, coauthored with Donald Morgan and Ihab Seblani. Despite a dozen studies, the welfare effects of payday credit are still debatable. We contribute new evidence to the debate by studying how payday credit access affects bank overdrafts (such as returned checks), bankruptcy, and household complaints against lenders and debt collectors. We find some evidence that Chapter 13 bankruptcy rates decrease after payday credit bans, but where we find that, we also find that complaints against lenders and debt collectors increase. The welfare implications of these offsetting movements are unclear. Our most robust finding is that returned check numbers and overdraft fee income at banks increase after payday credit bans. Bouncing a check may cost more than a payday loan, so this finding suggests that payday credit access helps households avoid costlier alternatives. While our findings obviously do not settle the welfare debate over payday lending, we hope they resolve it to some extent by illuminating how households rearrange their financial affairs when payday loan supply changes. In summary, this thesis nicely reflects my interests in labor economics, public policy, economic analysis using linked and administrative data, and education economics, and the econometric and research skills I have acquired during my five years as a graduate student in economics at Cornell.

    @PHDTHESIS{Strain2012,
    author = {Strain, Michael R.},
    title = {Essays on labor economics and public policy},
    school = {Cornell University},
    year = {2012},
    type = {Dissertation
    Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School
    of Cornell University
    in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of
    Doctor of Philosophy},
    abstract = {The main component of this thesis, found in the first chapter, is
    an investigation of earnings instability, which can be thought of
    as the fluctuations around permanent earnings over time of a worker's
    labor market earnings. This chapter reflects my interests in labor
    economics and in economic analysis using longitudinal, linked worker-firm
    data.
    The instability of labor earnings in the United States contributes
    to earnings inequality and may diminish household welfare. Despite
    the importance of earnings instability little is known about its
    correlates or causes. This study seeks to better understand whom
    earnings instability affects and why it affects them. Using both
    parametric and semi-parametric techniques, I provide an in-depth
    investigation into the relationship between earnings instability
    and worker skill. I find that earnings instability follows a U-shape
    over skill, with low-skill workers experiencing the least stable
    earnings, middle-skill workers experiencing the most stable, and
    high-skill workers falling in between the two. This finding is robust
    to a number of controls, sample selections, and other statistical
    concerns, and is not driven by workers entering and leaving employment,
    changing jobs, or holding multiple jobs. I then investigate whether
    firm characteristics affect the stability of worker earnings. I am
    the first to directly test the relationship between earnings instability
    and firm employment instability using linked employer-employee data.
    I find a positive and statistically significant relationship between
    the two that remains when the effect is estimated using only within-firm
    variation. This suggests that the effect is a feature of the way
    workers are being paid by their employer. The size of the effect
    varies by a worker's position in the earnings distribution: low-earning
    worker are passed a greater share of firm employment instability
    than higher-earning workers. This finding helps to explain the left
    tail of the U-shape of earnings instability over skill. I find significant
    heterogeneity in the magnitude and significance of the effect across
    industries and explore how the competitiveness of an industry relates
    to the size of the industry-specific effect.
    My interest in the economics of education is reflected in the second
    essay of this thesis, which studies a public policy innovation using
    administrative records. The effects of single-sex education are hotly
    contested, both in academic and policy circles. Despite this heated
    debate, there exists little credible empirical evidence of the effect
    of a U.S. public school's decision to offer single-sex classrooms
    on the educational outcomes of students. This study seeks to fill
    this hole. Using administrative records for third through eighth
    graders in North Carolina public schools, the chapter finds evidence
    that the offering of single-sex mathematics courses is associated
    with lower performance on end-of-grade math exams, and finds no evidence
    that the offering of single-sex reading scores increases performance
    on reading exams. Evidence of significant heterogeneity in the effect
    across schools is also presented.
    Finally, my interest in public policy is further reflected in the
    third chapter of this thesis, coauthored with Donald Morgan and Ihab
    Seblani. Despite a dozen studies, the welfare effects of payday credit
    are still debatable. We contribute new evidence to the debate by
    studying how payday credit access affects bank overdrafts (such as
    returned checks), bankruptcy, and household complaints against lenders
    and debt collectors. We find some evidence that Chapter 13 bankruptcy
    rates decrease after payday credit bans, but where we find that,
    we also find that complaints against lenders and debt collectors
    increase. The welfare implications of these offsetting movements
    are unclear. Our most robust finding is that returned check numbers
    and overdraft fee income at banks increase after payday credit bans.
    Bouncing a check may cost more than a payday loan, so this finding
    suggests that payday credit access helps households avoid costlier
    alternatives. While our findings obviously do not settle the welfare
    debate over payday lending, we hope they resolve it to some extent
    by illuminating how households rearrange their financial affairs
    when payday loan supply changes.
    In summary, this thesis nicely reflects my interests in labor economics,
    public policy, economic analysis using linked and administrative
    data, and education economics, and the econometric and research skills
    I have acquired during my five years as a graduate student in economics
    at Cornell.}
    }
  • D. A. Webber, "Essays on Imperfect Competition in the Labor Market," Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University In Partial Fulllment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy PhD Thesis, 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @PHDTHESIS{Webber2012,
    author = {Douglas Allen Webber},
    title = {Essays on Imperfect Competition in the Labor Market},
    school = {Cornell University},
    year = {2012},
    type = {Dissertation
    Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School
    of Cornell University
    In Partial Fulllment of the Requirements for the Degree of
    Doctor of Philosophy}
    }
2011
  • J. M. Abowd and L. Vilhuber, "National estimates of gross employment and job flows from the Quarterly Workforce Indicators with Demographic and Industry detail," Journal of Econometrics, vol. 161, pp. 82-99, 2011.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Abowd2011_direct,
    author = {J.M. Abowd and Lars Vilhuber},
    title = {National estimates of gross employment and job flows from the Quarterly
    Workforce Indicators with Demographic and Industry detail},
    journal = {Journal of Econometrics},
    year = {2011},
    volume = {161},
    pages = {82-99},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.08},
    url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21516213}
    }
  • J. M. Abowd and M. J. Schneider, "An Application of Differentially Private Linear Mixed Modelling," in ICDMW '11 Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE 11th International Conference on Data Mining Workshops, 2011.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @INPROCEEDINGS{AbowdSchneider_direct,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Matthew J. Schneider},
    title = {An Application of Differentially Private Linear Mixed Modelling},
    booktitle = {ICDMW '11 Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE 11th International Conference
    on Data Mining Workshops},
    year = {2011},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=6137437}
    }
  • J. M. Abowd and L. Vilhuber, "Gross Employment, Job Flows, and the Role of Education in the Great Recession," SOLE 2011.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Abowd2011_2_direct,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Lars Vilhuber},
    title = {Gross Employment, Job Flows, and the Role of Education in the Great
    Recession},
    institution = {SOLE},
    year = {2011},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://www.sole-jole.org/12524.pdf}
    }
  • A. Dube, W. T. Lester, and M. Reich, "Do Frictions Matter in the Labor Market? Accessions, Separations and Minimum Wage Effects," Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, UC Berkeley 2011.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{dube_2011,
    author = {Arindrajit Dube and T. William Lester and Michael Reich},
    title = {Do Frictions Matter in the Labor Market? Accessions, Separations
    and Minimum Wage Effects},
    institution = {Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics, Institute for Research on
    Labor and Employment, UC Berkeley},
    year = {2011},
    month = {June},
    url = {www.irle.berkeley.edu/workingpapers/222-10.pdf}
    }
  • M. Freedman and E. Owens, "Low-Income Housing Development and Crime," Journal of Urban Economics, vol. 70, pp. 115-231, 2011.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Freedman2011_direct,
    author = {Matthew Freedman and Emily Owens},
    title = {Low-Income Housing Development and Crime},
    journal = {Journal of Urban Economics},
    year = {2011},
    volume = {70},
    pages = {115-231},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.08},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0094119011000301}
    }
  • K. R. Gittings and I. Schmutte, "Getting Handcuffs on Octopus: Minimum Wages, Employment and Turnover," 2011.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Gittings_direct,
    author = {R. Kaj Gittings and Ian Schmutte},
    title = {Getting Handcuffs on Octopus: Minimum Wages, Employment and Turnover},
    year = {2011},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://schmutte.myweb.uga.edu/content/GittingsSchmutte_MinWage.pdf}
    }
  • W. D. Hansen and H. Naughton, "Social and Ecological Determinants of Land Clearing in the Brazilian Amazon: A Spatial Analysis," University of Montana 2011.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Hansen_direct,
    author = {Winslow D. Hansen and Helen Naughton},
    title = {Social and Ecological Determinants of Land Clearing in the {B}razilian
    {A}mazon: {A} Spatial Analysis},
    institution = {University of Montana},
    year = {2011},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://www.cas.umt.edu/facultydatabase/FILES_Faculty/1160/rainforest.pdf}
    }
  • S. K. Kinney, J. P. Reiter, A. P. Reznek, J. Miranda, R. S. Jarmin, and J. M. Abowd, "Towards Unrestricted Public Use Business Microdata: The Synthetic Longitudinal Business Database," International Statistical Review, vol. 79, iss. 3, pp. 362-384, 2011.
    [Abstract] [DOI] [URL] [Bibtex]

    In most countries, national statistical agencies do not release establishment-level business microdata, because doing so represents too large a risk to establishments\' confidentiality. One approach with the potential for overcoming these risks is to release synthetic data; that is, the released establishment data are simulated from statistical models designed to mimic the distributions of the underlying real microdata. In this article, we describe an application of this strategy to create a public use file for the Longitudinal Business Database, an annual economic census of establishments in the United States comprising more than 20 million records dating back to 1976. The U.S. Bureau of the Census and the Internal Revenue Service recently approved the release of these synthetic microdata for public use, making the synthetic Longitudinal Business Database the first-ever business microdata set publicly released in the United States. We describe how we created the synthetic data, evaluated analytical validity, and assessed disclosure risk.

    @ARTICLE{KinneyEtAl2011,
    author = {Kinney, Satkartar K. and Reiter, Jerome P. and Reznek, Arnold P.
    and Miranda, Javier and Jarmin, Ron S. and Abowd, John M.},
    title = {Towards Unrestricted Public Use Business Microdata: The Synthetic
    Longitudinal Business Database},
    journal = {International Statistical Review},
    year = {2011},
    volume = {79},
    pages = {362--384},
    number = {3},
    doi = {10.1111/j.1751-5823.2011.00153.x},
    issn = {1751-5823},
    keywords = {Economic census, data confidentiality, synthetic data, disclosure
    limitation},
    owner = {vilhuber},
    publisher = {Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
    timestamp = {2012.09.04},
    abstract = {In most countries, national statistical agencies do not release establishment-level
    business microdata, because doing so represents too large a risk
    to establishments\' confidentiality. One approach with the potential
    for overcoming these risks is to release synthetic data; that is,
    the released establishment data are simulated from statistical models
    designed to mimic the distributions of the underlying real microdata.
    In this article, we describe an application of this strategy to create
    a public use file for the Longitudinal Business Database, an annual
    economic census of establishments in the United States comprising
    more than 20 million records dating back to 1976. The U.S. Bureau
    of the Census and the Internal Revenue Service recently approved
    the release of these synthetic microdata for public use, making the
    synthetic Longitudinal Business Database the first-ever business
    microdata set publicly released in the United States. We describe
    how we created the synthetic data, evaluated analytical validity,
    and assessed disclosure risk.},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-5823.2011.00153.x}
    }
  • E. Owens, "Truthiness-in-Punishment -The Far Reach of Truth in Sentencing Laws," Journal of Empirical Legal Studies: Judgement by the Numbers - Converting Qualitative to quantitaive Judgements in Law, vol. 8(s1), pp. 239-261, 2011.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Owens2011_direct,
    author = {Emily Owens},
    title = {Truthiness-in-Punishment -The Far Reach of Truth in Sentencing Laws},
    journal = {Journal of Empirical Legal Studies: Judgement by the Numbers - Converting
    Qualitative to quantitaive Judgements in Law},
    year = {2011},
    volume = {8(s1)},
    pages = {239-261},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.08},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1740-1461.2011.01228.x/abstract}
    }
2010
  • J. M. Abowd, F. Kramarz, S. Perez-Duarte, and I. Schmutte, "A Formal Test of Assortative Matching in the Labor Market," NBER Working Paper 15546 2010.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Abowd2010,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Francis Kramarz and Sebastien Perez-Duarte and
    Ian Schmutte},
    title = {A Formal Test of Assortative Matching in the Labor Market},
    institution = {NBER Working Paper 15546},
    year = {2010},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://www.nber.org/papers/w15546}
    }
  • J. M. Abowd, K. McKinney, and I. M. Schmutte, "How Important is Endogenous Mobility for Measuring Employer and Employee Heterogeneity," SOLE 2010.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Abowd2010a,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Kevin McKinney and Ian M. Schmutte},
    title = {How Important is Endogenous Mobility for Measuring Employer and Employee
    Heterogeneity},
    institution = {SOLE},
    year = {2010},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://www.sole-jole.org/11332.pdf}
    }
2009
  • J. M. Abowd, J. Gehrke, and L. Vilhuber, "Parameter Explorations For Synthetic Data with Privacy Guarantees for OnTheMap." 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @CONFERENCE{Abowd2009,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Johannes Gehrke and Lars Vilhuber},
    title = {Parameter Explorations For Synthetic Data with Privacy Guarantees
    for OnTheMap},
    year = {2009},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.08}
    }
  • G. Adler and D. Hilber, "Industry Hiring Patterns of Older Workers," Research on Aging, vol. 31, pp. 60-88, 2009.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Adler2009_reference,
    author = {Geri Adler and Don Hilber},
    title = {Industry Hiring Patterns of Older Workers},
    journal = {Research on Aging},
    year = {2009},
    volume = {31},
    pages = {60-88},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.08},
    url = {http://roa.sagepub.com/content/31/1/69.abstract}
    }
  • C. Dwork and A. Smith, "Differential Privacy for Statistic: What we Know and What we Want to Learn," Journal of Privacy and Confidentiality, vol. 1, pp. 135-154, 2009.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Dwork2009_reference,
    author = {Cynthia Dwork and Adam Smith},
    title = {Differential Privacy for Statistic: What we Know and What we Want
    to Learn},
    journal = {Journal of Privacy and Confidentiality},
    year = {2009},
    volume = {1},
    pages = {135-154},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.08},
    url = {http://repository.cmu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1008&context=jpc}
    }
  • J. P. Thompson, "Using Local labor Market Data to Re-Examine the Employment Effects of the Minimum Wage," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, vol. 62, pp. 343-366, 2009.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Thompson2009_reference,
    author = {Jeffrey P. Thompson},
    title = {Using Local labor Market Data to Re-Examine the Employment Effects
    of the Minimum Wage},
    journal = {Industrial and Labor Relations Review},
    year = {2009},
    volume = {62},
    pages = {343-366},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.08},
    url = {http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1697&context=ilrreview}
    }
2008
  • E. Harper-Anderson, "Measuring the Connection Between Workforce Development and Economic Development: examining the Role of Sectors for Local Outcomes," Economic Development Quarterly, vol. 22, pp. 119-135, 2008.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Harper-Anderson2008_reference,
    author = {Elsie Harper-Anderson},
    title = {Measuring the Connection Between Workforce Development and Economic
    Development: examining the Role of Sectors for Local Outcomes},
    journal = {Economic Development Quarterly},
    year = {2008},
    volume = {22},
    pages = {119-135},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.08},
    url = {http://edq.sagepub.com/content/22/2/119.abstract}
    }
2007
  • M. J. Hicks, "Job Turnover and Wages in the Retail Sector: The Influence of Wal-Mart," Journal of Private Enterprise, vol. 22, pp. 137-160, 2007.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Hicks2007_reference,
    author = {Michael J. Hicks},
    title = {Job Turnover and Wages in the Retail Sector: The Influence of Wal-Mart},
    journal = {Journal of Private Enterprise},
    year = {2007},
    volume = {22},
    pages = {137-160},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.08},
    url = {http://journal.apee.org/index.php?title=Spring2007_6}
    }
2006
  • J. Lane, N. English, F. Andersson, and P. Park, "Workforce Development and Rental Policy: How Can What We Know Inform Next Steps?," Prepared for Revisiting Rental Housing: A National Policy Summit 2006.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Lane2006_reference,
    author = {Julia Lane and Ned English and Fredrik Andersson and Patrick Park},
    title = {Workforce Development and Rental Policy: How Can What We Know Inform
    Next Steps?},
    institution = {Prepared for Revisiting Rental Housing: A National Policy Summit},
    year = {2006},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.07.01},
    url = {http://www.jchs.harvard.edu/sites/jchs.harvard.edu/files/rr07-17_lane.pdf}
    }
  • B. E. Stephens, "Essays on Firm Compensation Policy and Confidentiality Protection and Imputation in the Quarterly Workforce Indicators," PhD Thesis, 2006.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @PHDTHESIS{Stephens2006_reference,
    author = {Bryce E. Stephens},
    title = {Essays on Firm Compensation Policy and Confidentiality Protection
    and Imputation in the Quarterly Workforce Indicators},
    school = {University of Maryland},
    year = {2006},
    note = {http://hdl.handle.net/1903/4075},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.10},
    url = {http://drum.lib.umd.edu//handle/1903/4075}
    }
2005
  • J. M. Abowd, B. E. Stephens, and Lars, "Confidentiality Protection in the Census Bureasu Quarterly Workforce Indicators," Census Bureau, TP-2006-02, 2005.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{stephens2005_reference,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Bryce E. Stephens and Lars},
    title = {Confidentiality Protection in the Census Bureasu Quarterly Workforce
    Indicators},
    institution = {Census Bureau},
    year = {2005},
    number = {TP-2006-02},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.10},
    url = {http://lehd.ces.census.gov/led/library/techpapers/tp-2006-02.pdf}
    }
2004
  • J. Abowd and J. Lane, "New Approaches to Confidentiality Protection: Synthetic Data, Remote Access and Research Data Centers," , J. Domingo-Ferrer and V. Torra, Eds., Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 2004, pp. 282-289.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @INBOOK{Abowd2004_reference,
    pages = {282-289},
    title = {New Approaches to Confidentiality Protection: Synthetic Data, Remote
    Access and Research Data Centers},
    publisher = {Berlin: Springer-Verlag},
    year = {2004},
    editor = {Josep Domingo-Ferrer and Vicenc Torra},
    author = {John Abowd and Julia Lane},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.08},
    url = {https://courses.cit.cornell.edu/jma7/abowd-lane-barcelona-2004.pdf}
    }
  • J. M. Abowd, J. Haltiwanger, and J. Lane, "Integrated Longitudinal Employer-Employee Data for the United States," The American Economic Review, vol. 94, iss. 2, pp. 224-229, 2004.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Lane2004_reference,
    author = {John M. Abowd and John Haltiwanger and Julia Lane},
    title = {Integrated Longitudinal Employer-Employee Data for the United States},
    journal = {The American Economic Review},
    year = {2004},
    volume = {94},
    pages = {224-229},
    number = {2},
    month = {January},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.10},
    url = {http://pubs.aeaweb.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1257/0002828041301812}
    }
2002
  • J. M. Abowd and L. Vilhuber, "The Sensitivity of Economic Statistics to Coding Errors in Personal Identifiers," U.S. Census Bureau 2002.
    [URL] [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{Abowd2002_reference,
    author = {John M. Abowd and Lars Vilhuber},
    title = {The Sensitivity of Economic Statistics to Coding Errors in Personal
    Identifiers},
    institution = {U.S. Census Bureau},
    year = {2002},
    note = {Technical Paper TP-2002-17},
    keywords = {jabref:noKeywordAssigned},
    owner = {kr328},
    timestamp = {2012.06.19},
    url = {https://courses.cit.cornell.edu/jma7/SSNedit-comparison-jbes-rev6.pdf}
    }